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Action on Smoking and Health (ASH-UK) released their latest survey -  http://www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_891.pdf";http://www.ash.org.uk...
 
They also updated their Electronic Cigarettes Brief - www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_715.pdf";http://www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_715.pdf
 
 
• ASH estimates that there are currently 2.1 million adults in Great Britain using electronic
cigarettes, Of these, approximately 700,000 are ex-smokers while 1.3 million continue to
use tobacco alongside their electronic cigarette use. Electronic cigarette use amongst never
smokers remains negligible.
 
<em;Total sample size was 12,269. Fieldwork was undertaken between 5th and</em;
<em;14th March 2014. All surveys were carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are</em;
<em;representative of all GB Adults (aged 18+).</em;
&nbsp;
• Among children, sustained use is rare and generally confined to children who
currently or have previously smoked. Eight percent (13% among 16-18 year olds) had
tried electronic cigarettes at least once or twice. Two percent reported using them monthly
or weekly. Among children who reported ever using electronic cigarettes, 33% had used
them in the last month. Of those who had heard of e-cigarettes and had never smoked a
cigarette, 98% reported never having tried electronic cigarettes and 2% reported having
tried them “once or twice”. There is almost no evidence of regular electronic cigarette use
among children who have never smoked or who have only tried smoking once.
&nbsp;
• Few children who have never used them expect to use an electronic cigarette soon,
except those who already smoke. Only 1% of those who had never smoked think that
they would try an electronic cigarette soon. This remained unchanged from 2013.
&nbsp;
• Frequent (more than weekly) use of electronic cigarettes by children was confined
almost entirely to ex-smokers and daily smokers.
<em;Total sample size was 2,068 children aged 11 to 18. Fieldwork was undertaken&nbsp;
21st March – 1st&nbsp;April 2014.</em;

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