One Minute of Marijuana Secondhand Smoke Exposure Substantially Impairs Vascular Endothelial Function

In July, 2016, UCSF Professor of Medicine, Matthew L. Springer, PhD, and his research colleagues at UCSF, published "One Minute of Marijuana Secondhand Smoke Exposure Substantially Impairs Vascular Endothelial Function" in Journal of the American Heart Association. According to their research, one minute of exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) from marijuana diminishes blood vessel function to the same extent as tobacco, but the harmful cardiovascular effects last three times longer, according to a new study in rats led by the UC San Francisco researchers. “Your blood vessels can carry more blood if they sense that they need to pass more blood to the tissues,” Springer said. “They dilate to allow more blood through. But that’s inhibited by exposure to smoke.” In a healthy animal, increased blood flow prompts arteries to widen, a process known as flow-mediated dilation (FMD). When FMD is compromised, as happens during SHS exposure, blood flow is impeded, and the risks of heart attack, atherosclerosis and other heart problems increase, said Springer.  To read the full article, click here