The Center has an active research training program for postdoctoral fellows. Click here for information on the program and to view/complete the application. This page lists current fellows and describes their work. Click on any fellow's name to view their complete profile and contact information.

  • Dr. Drea Burbank grew up in a mountainous region of Idaho and had a previous career as a wildland firefighter.  Eventually she returned to school, attending medical school in a specialized rural and remote training program at the University of British Columbia, and graduated in 2013.  Between medical school and residency Dr. Burbank decided to explore medical futures, with interests in technology and preventative medicine.  In 2014, she worked at a digital health startup in Silicon Valley, and attended Stanford University’s preventative medicine course “Health 4 All”.

  • Lauren Dutra’s research interests include disparities in smoking and smoking-related disease, the targeted marketing of vulnerable populations by tobacco companies, and new tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes.  She has a Doctor of Science from the Harvard School of Public Health and is a Social Epidemiologist by training.

  • Dr. Catherine O. Egbe holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), South Africa; MEd in Guidance and Counselling and BSc(Ed) in Biology/Education; both from the University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria. For the past two years, she held a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship position at UKZN working on the PRogramme for Improving Mental health CarE (PRIME), South Africa and Emerging Mental Health Systems in Low-and Middle-income countries (EMERALD) projects.  She has a special interests in Health Promotion, Tobacco Control and Health related Stigma.

  • Noah received his PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, OR. His dissertation research utilized behavioral and genetic animal models that have been well established for alcohol research to study the combined effects of nicotine and alcohol on reward and neuroadaptation, with the goal of understanding why these two drugs share such a high rate of co-abuse.

  • Louisa Holmes earned her PhD in Geography from University of Southern California. In her first year as a CTCRE fellow she implemented a multi-mode probabilistic household survey of young adult tobacco use and health in the Bay Area. In her second year, Louisa implemented another data collection project in collaboration with Pam Ling and colleagues in the Center for Health among Minority Youth and Adults in which she collected novel neighborhood-level and retail environment data.

  • Margarete C. Kulik is a postdoctoral fellow at the CTCRE. She received her PhD in Public Health from the Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Her dissertation was based on her work in two European research projects which had the goal of developing and applying innovative quantification tools to assess the impact of policies and interventions on risk factor prevalence and on health inequalities across Europe.

  • Dr. Karma McKelvey graduated in 2014, with a PhD in Public Health, specializing in epidemiology.  She earned her MPH in Epidemiology & Biostatistics in 2011, and also completed graduate work in Anthropology and Sociology.  She achieved a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and an AA in Drama.  Prevention before treatment, holism before atomism, and an interest in addictions are central areas of focus in her work. 

  • Dr. Anne Berit Petersen earned bachelor degrees in English Literature and Nursing, and in 2006, she completed two masters degrees in Public Health and Nursing with an emphasis in Health Promotion & Education and Maternal Child Health.  She earned her PhD in 2015, from UCSF’s School of Nursing.  She has a strong commitment to the empowerment of nurses and health professionals, both here in the U.S. and globally, in the areas of tobacco-dependence prevention and treatment. 

  • Lucy Popova's overarching research interest lies in health promotion through theory-based prevention and treatment interventions to reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. She is particularly interested in understanding the factors contributing to health behavior, such as perceptions, beliefs, and emotions. Lucy received a Ph.D. in Communication from University of California, Santa Barbara. Her graduate research focused on deciphering the mechanisms of media effects in order to help people cope with negative consequences of media exposure and to enhance positive media effects.