Stanton Glantz, PhD's blog

CalPERS needs to carefully consider possible conflicts of interest for consultant advising it get back into tobacco

I just arrived back from vacation to hear that, based on the advice on the investment consulting firm Wilshire Associates, the California Public Employee Retirement System (CalPERS) was considering reversing its longstanding policy of not investing in tobacco stocks.
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Center for Public Integrity publishes well-done story on aggressive lobbying by big tobacco to protect e-cigarettes

Nicholaw Kusnetz at the Center for Public Integrity just published an excellent in-depth story, How Big Tobacco lobbies to safeguard e-cigarettes, about the massive lobbying effort that the big cigarette companies are mounting to protect e-cigarettes.  While national in scope, there is strong coverage in California, including how the industry uses large strategic campaign contributions to the Asse Read more »

NIH webcast meeting is a great opportunity to learn about science and policy issues around marijuana

The NIH held a fascinating meeting Marijuana and Cannabinoids: A Neuroscience Research Summit  on March 22-23, 2016.  It highlighted a wide range of scientific issues around marijuana and cannabinoids, including a policy session at the end of Day 2. 
 
The videocasts are now available.  The policy session was the last one on Day 2, before the concluding remarks by Nora and Robert Califf starting at 2:59.  Enjoy!
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Another study shows e-cig minimum age laws associated with slightly more cig smoking; no evidence on effect on e-cig use

A second paper, “The influence of electronic cigarette age purchasing restrictions on adolescent tobacco and marijuana use,” was just published in Prevnetive Medicine by Michael Pesko and colleagues from Cornell.  They found that youth cigarette smoking rates in states that prohibited e-cigarette sales to youth were 0.8 percentage points higher than in states without such laws.  (This estimate is similar to the 0.9 percentage point increase Read more »

Quitting cold turkey works better; may help explain why e-cigs depress quitting cigs

Nicola Lindson-Hawley and colleagues just published a well-done study, “Gradual versus abrupt smoking cessation,” that compared gradual vs. abrupt smoking cessation and found that abrupt cessation worked better.  People who tried to quit by tapering down rather than just stopping were 20-30% less likely to succeed in quitting smoking.
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Exposure to onscreen smoking in movies in New Zealand accounts for greater fraction of smoking than in USA

Philip Gendall, Janet Hoek, Richard Edwards, and I just published "Effect of Exposure to Smoking in Movies on Young Adult Smoking in New Zealand" in PLOS One.  This paper showed that 18-25 year olds in New Zealand were affected by exposure to on-screen smoking just as youth around the world are, with people who saw more smoking being more likely to smoke. Read more »

Korean kids who use e-cigarettes have a lot more asthma and days lost from school

Jun Ho Cho and Samuel Y Pak just published an excellent paper, “Association between electronic cigarette use and asthma among high school students in South Korea,” which convincingly demonstrates that high school students (around 16 years old) who use e-cigarettes are much more likely to develop asthma (diagnosed by a doctor) and miss more days of school.
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Direct evidence of tobacco product placement and smoking behavioral placement in French movies

Direct evidence of tobacco product placement and smoking behavioral placement in French movies

Prepared by Pascal Diethelm, president, OxyRomandie Read more »

RJ Reynold’s Unpublished Randomized Controlled Trial Finds that Camel Snus is Not Effective for Smoking Cessation

We just submitted this public comment to the FDA.  The tracking number is 1k0-8ob6-gewv. (PDF version)
 
RJ Reynold’s Unpublished Randomized Controlled Trial Finds that Camel Snus is Not Effective for Smoking Cessation
 
Docket No. FDA-2016-N-0073
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RJ Reynold’s Unpublished Randomized Controlled Trial Finds that Camel Snus is Not Effective for Smoking Cessation

We just submitted this public comment to the FDA.  The tracking number is 1k0-8ob6-gewv. (PDF version)
 
RJ Reynold’s Unpublished Randomized Controlled Trial Finds that Camel Snus is Not Effective for Smoking Cessation
 
Docket No. FDA-2016-N-0073
  Read more »

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