Tobacco Center Faculty Blog

January 16, 2014

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

I am in DC for the press conference where the report will be presented.  Here are some quick reactions, based on the Executive Summary:

It highlights the importance of smoking in the movies as a cause of smoking and concludes that “Actions [i.e., R rating onscreen smoking] that would eliminate the depiction of tobacco use in movies, which are produces and rated as appropriate for children and adolescents, could have a significant effect on preventing youth from becoming tobacco users.”

January 12, 2014

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Ken Johnson and I just published a paper, "The Surgeon General Report on Smoking and Health 50 Years Later: Breast Cancer and the Cost of Increasing Caution," in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention highlighting the fact that the evidence linking both active and passive smoking continues to pile up.
 
Here is the abstract:
 

January 11, 2014

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Rong Zablocki and colleagues recently published a nice paper that followed 1718 California smokers from 2009 to 2011 to see what effect smokefree homes and percieving laws requiring smokefree outdoors had on their smoking behavior.
 
Living in a smokefree home more than doubled the odds of smoking less (adjusted odds ratio 2.4) and making a quit attempt (AOR 2.3).  Perceived smokefree outdoor policies nearly doubled the odds of smoking less (AOR 1.9) and making a quit attempt (AOR 1.8).
 
This paper adds to the growing evidence that smokefree policies not only protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke, but also help smokers quit.
 
The full paper, "Smoking ban policies and their influence on smoking behaviors among current California smokers: A population-based study," was published in Preventive Medicine and is available here.

January 11, 2014

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Kelvin Choi and Jean Forester just published a well-done longitudinal study of young adults  that followed young adults in Minnesota for one year and examined how attitudes about e-cigarettes affected behavior.
 
They report that one year after entering the study 7.4% of the young adults reported ever using e-cigarettes (21.6% among baseline current smokers, 11.9% among baseline former smokers, and 2.9% among baseline nonsmokers).  Put another way, 11.9% of people who had quit smoking before the study started were using e-cigarettes at the end as were 2.9% of people who had never smoked.  For these people, e-cigarettes were a pathway to renewed or new nicotine addiction.
 

January 11, 2014

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Today NPR Morning Edition interviewed Ken Warner on the impact of the 1964 Surgeon General report.  During the interview Ken repeated the mantra that increasing taxes is  the most effective tobacco control policy.
 
There is a strong consensus that people smoke less as the price increases, with a price elasticity of -0.4 for adults and -0.65 for adolescents.  What this means is that a 10% increase in price leads to a 4% reduction in consumption by adults and a 6.5% reduction among youth.  Put another way, the effect of the price increase will depend on how big it is.
 
This also means that it is possible to compare the relative effects of different tobacco control policies to each other by computing the size of the price (tax) increase that it would take to achieve the same effect.
 

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