Tobacco Center Faculty Blog

February 9, 2012

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD
The Welsh Government has launched a consultation to amend the smokefree premises legislation to create an exemption that would allow allow performers to smoke in enclosed and partially enclosed spaces when filming for television or film.  The moving force behind this is the BBC, which has lobbied the first minister in Wales, Carwyn Jones, to create this exemption claiming that productions have stayed in England where there is currently such an exemption in the smokefree regulations.
Of all the crazy economic arguments I have heard for exposing people to secondhand smoke, this one takes the cake.
Are we really to believe that the BBC has ignored the fact that it just opened a major new production center in Cardiff, Wales to take advantage of lower labor costs that exist in London just so they can favor actors generate secondhand smoke? I think not.

February 8, 2012

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

The recent news that the Obama Administration and some attorneys general are trying to push through a quick deal with the banks to settle state lawsuits against the banks for a wide range of mortgage fraud in which the banks would get immunity from further liability exchange for around $20 billion reminds me of the "global settlement" of tobacco lawsuits that the Clinton Administration tried to push through to end litigation against the tobacco industry in the mid-1990s.

Then, as now, a group of state attorneys general (as well as private attorneys) were pressing lawsuits against a major industry with legions of lawyers and there was pressure from the national government and some of the attorneys general to settle the cases before the full range of industry misbehavior was understood.   The deal then was a trade that effectively granted Big Tobacco immunity from further litigation in exchange for some money, some voluntary agreements on marketing, and a form of FDA regulation.

Almost everyone got on "the train that was leaving the station" on the grounds that the global settlement was inevitable, and they did not want to be left behind.

February 6, 2012

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

A new UCSF analysis has found that a state ballot initiative to increase the cigarette tax would create about 12,000 jobs and nearly $2 billion in new economic activity in California.

The study found that the new tax would have a significant effect on the state’s overall economy because Californians would smoke less and spend their money in other ways.

The initiative, the California Cancer Research Act (CCRA), is on the statewide June 5 ballot. If the measure is approved, state cigarette taxes would rise by $1 a pack, generating an estimated $855 million a year for anti-smoking education programs, medical research, and tobacco law enforcement.

“The primary impact to the California economy, besides the effect on health care, is that people will smoke less and send less money out of state,’’ said study author Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, a professor of medicine at UCSF and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education based at UCSF.

Currently, approximately 80 percent of money spent on tobacco products is exported to out-of-state tobacco manufacturers and farmers. No tobacco is grown in California and no cigarettes are manufactured here.

February 5, 2012

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

On September 20, 2007, after a multi-year debate the UC Regents adopted a compromise policy on acceptance of money for research from the tobacco industry.  While then-President Robert Dynes, with the support of the Academic Senate, defeated the proposal by then-Chairman of the Board of Regents Richard Blum to establish a policy of not accepting tobacco industry funding, the Regents did adopt a policy (known as RE-89) that recognized that money from the tobacco industry was problematic and required that any new proposals to the tobacco industry undergo additional internal peer review and that the campus chancellor personally approve any such proposal.  It also required that the President make an annual report to the Regents on any new tobacco industry grants.

According to UC President Yudof's most recent report, since then there has not been a single new tobacco industry grant within the entire University of California.

There are only two remaining grants (that date from before RE-89), totaling $2.9 million, both from Philip Morris USA:

February 5, 2012

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Our first effort to webcast the symposium garnered a lot of positive feedback.  We have turned it into a podcast, which you can watch it by clicking here.

The podcast has an index showing the presentation slides, so you can skip to specific talks if you don't want to watch the whole thing.

 

Pages