Tobacco Center Faculty Blog

August 27, 2011

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Simon Chapman and Matthew Farrelly published an essay in PLoS Medicine that appeared in the same issue as our paper repeating Simon’s well-worn arguments.  Their essay is here.

Here is our comment on their arguments:

SMOKING IN MOVIES: ARGUMENTS VS. EVIDENCE

Chapman and Farrelly’s essay [1], “Four Arguments Against the Adult-Rating of Movies with Smoking Scenes,” reflects the same fundamental misunderstanding of the logic and implications of modernizing the ratings system that Chapman made in a similar essay in 2008 [2].

August 27, 2011

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Government Inaction on Ratings and Government Subsidies to the US Film Industry Help Promote Youth Smoking

by Chris Millett, Jonothan Polansky, Stanton Glantz was published earlier this week in PLoS Medicine at http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001077

Here is the editors’ summary:

August 27, 2011

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

See the ad at http://www.smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/ourads/ad_sfm80.htm

Smoke Free Movies has launched a series of print advertisements in Variety and other publications. This advertisement first ran in the August 23, 2011 edition of Variety and September 2, 2011 edition of The Hollywood Reporter.

If smoking is essential to your film, stand up and take the R-rating.

Producers of comic book movies seem to think flying saucers and cigarettes go together. Other producers appear to be convinced that any melodrama set before 2005 is a solemn opportunity to show people chain smoking.

Do you believe either one of these things? Then stand up for what you believe. Take the R-rating.

April 18, 2011

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

I have been a skeptic about the value of minimum purchase laws as strategy for reducing youth smoking, but a study we just published from England showed that increasing the minimum purchase age from 16 to 18 was associated with a drop in smoking among 11-15 year olds, even after taking into account the existing downward trend.  The effects were similar across socio-economic groups. We did not have the data to evaluate whether these effects persisted as kids got older (i.e., Did the law prevent initiation or just delay it?).  It will take a few years to answer that question because we have to wait for the kids to get older. In any event, raising the minimum age to 18 was a good thing.

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