Tobacco Center Faculty Blog

March 2, 2015

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Researchers at the American Cancer Society, Harvard, and National Cancer Institute published “Smoking and Mortality – Beyond Established Causes” in the New England Journal of Medicine on February 12, 2015.  This paper attracted a lot of media attention because it added several new diseases to the list that smoking causes, including breast cancer, which added another 60,000 deaths to the annual toll.
 
The fact that researchers at the American Cancer Society and Harvard are now recognizing that smoking causes breast cancer is a big development, since they have been the main skeptics of the conclusion that secondhand smoke caused breast cancer in younger, primarily premenopausal women that the California Environmental Protection Agency reached ten years ago, in 2005.
 
The ACS/Harvard/NCI paper concluded that smoking increased the risk of breast cancer by about 30% (a relative risk of 1.3 with a 95% confidence interval extending from 1.2 to 1.5) in older women (55 and older).  This is about the same risk that Ken Johnson and I estimated based on smaller studies than in the new paper.
 

March 2, 2015

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

I attended the Society for Nicotine and Tobacco Research meeting last week and it was one of the best meetings on tobacco control I ever attended.  All the presentations I saw were intelligent and well-balanced and I learned a lot.
 
Putting these meetings togeher is hard and I wanted to publicly thank the organizing committee led by Jodi Prochaska for a job well done.

February 24, 2015

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

This one day event is to introduce advoactes, students, health professionals, journalists and anyone else is interested in how to use tobacco industry documents in their work.  The workshop is at the UCSF Library at 530 Parnassus in San Francisco.
 
The registration form is online at http://bit.ly/UCSFTDWS2015.
 
Please feel free to forward it to anyone who you feel may be interested. We look forward to seeing you there!
 
For more information, contact:
 
Jonathan Leff, MLIS
Operations Analyst
UCSF Center for Tobacco Control, Research and Education
530 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 366
San Francisco, CA 94143-1390
 
Tel: (415) 502-6341
Fax: (415) 514-9345
[email protected]

February 24, 2015

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

Today Tobacco Free Kids launched its "Knock Tobacco Out of the Park" campaign to get spit tobacco out of Major League Baseball.  (The press release is here.)
 
Because the league, owners and players have refused to stop promotting tobacco to millions of people attending and viewing baseball, TFK and other health advocates have been working with lawmakers in Sacramento and San Francisco to introduced legislation  that will eliminate the use of all tobacco products, including smokeless tobacco, at all baseball venues. 
 
The effort is timed to coincide with the start of Spring Training.  The legislation sends a simple and powerful message to kids: baseball and tobacco don’t mix.
 

February 21, 2015

Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

This just out from our colleagues at Breathe California:
 
SACRAMENTO, Calif. Feb. 21, 2015 — A California movie awards show this weekend brought out the stars who highlight the issue that Hollywood can still hook kids on tobacco, but along with the bad news also came some good news at the 20th annual Hackademy Awards in Sacramento.
 
The stars at this Feb. 21 red-carpet gala were more than 40 teen volunteers at the 20th Annual Hackademy Awards, produced by Breathe California of Sacramento-Emigrant Trails through its Thumbs Up! Thumbs Down! program. Reviewers analyzed 128 movies during 2014 for portrayals, if any, of tobacco use. About half were PG and PG-13 movies. And some, such as Thumbs Up! Winner “The Fault in Our Stars,” accurately depicted tobacco use as a deadly health threat.
 
Reviewers found more tobacco-free movies compared to 2013, when 45 percent of reviewed movies didn’t include smoking or cigar use. That number  rose to 57 percent in 2014. But where there was smoking, there was a lot more of it. For example, scenes featuring actors smoking jumped from an average of nearly seven to more than 10 per hour for PG-13 movies with tobacco use.
 

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